“Be Intolerant” by Ryan Dobson

This is not a sponsored post.

 

Be Intolerant, by Ryan Dobson, is an excellent read for anyone who questions what moral relativism is, or the like. Ryan walks us through the reality that we cannot claim to have a Christian walk with shades of gray, and that morality cannot be defined apart from Christ. I could not help but jot down notes as I read through this book. This book is a must for any Christian, and should be part of every Christianity 101 or DMD program out there. I will be adding it to my DMD program required readings list as I being to formulate what the program looks like on paper.

 

In essence, Moral Relativism just flat doesn’t work. In reality, it is an option to talk about anything except Y’shua. Ryan states it great, “Moral relativism doesn’t follow its own rules, the rules it judges everyone else by. We’re tolerant of all – except you, you and you. There is no standard of right and wrong – except for when you violate what we say is right. You can follow any religion you please – as long as it’s on our list of accepted ones. We love to hear alternative voices – but if you try to talk to us about Jesus, we will silence you. We’re totally in favor of `anything-goes’ morality – unless you use that freedom with my girlfriend, or cut me off in traffic, or steal from my. It’s not just hypocritical, it’s fundamentally broken.”

 

Many education settings try to adopt foolish and broken concepts of inclusivity, diversity, and similar words that translate to “broken garbage that Satan throws out there because we are like the dog that returns to our own vomit.” Central Oregon Community College does the same in many aspects. Every religion – except the faith of Christianity – is accepted. There is just something about that, isn’t there? The fact that Christ is real and others aren’t, perhaps? And in the end, it’s about heaven or hell…no gray in between.

 

 

 

And then there is the issue of Christians that cling so closely to their sin…and refuse to give it up. Smoking, for example, is sin. Alcohol, as well (more specifically, drunkenness).

 

Ryan addresses all of this, and more. Even video games. And you know – he’s dead on. Anyone that disagrees with what is presented in this book obviously disagrees with the Bible, since that is pretty much what he is repeating here.

 

He breaks it down into three options for us…

 

1) comply with what the Bible says

2) do what you want but suffer the consequences

3) make up your own philosophy that says G-d’s Word is wrong

 

In reality, only option #1 gets you to heaven…the others go to hell.

 

I could go on and on and share more, but in truth, get this book and read it. In the end, I hope you’ll agree with Ryan (I do), that “Moral Relativism is sin in a toga.”

 

If not, then there are deeper issues, such as your salvation, at hand…

Disclosure: I have received a reviewer copy and/or payment in exchange for an honest review of the product mentioned in this post.

“The Noticer” by Andy Andrews

“The Noticer,” by Andy Andrews, is a simple fictional story about a man named Jones. Not Mr. Jones, just Jones. He calls himself a Noticer, someone gifted in noticing things in life – very much so from a different perspective than those in the situation. He travels through several individual’s lives during the book, narrated by the first person mentioned in the story. While we never get to see Jones’ perspective at every situation, or truly discover who he is, there are suggestions that lead you to a story similar to the Holy Bible…

 

Excellently written, this story includes a “group study” section in the back for use in small groups. That being said, this is a great read that is simple to understand and brief, while allowing a deeper understanding for those looking behind the scenes. Overall plot, characters, scenery, etc., permitted me to visualize the story taking place, as if I were a participant. Not many books give me the perspective of the narrator, however, at times this one did.

 

Overall, the message was inspiring and excellent. Andy writes this book as if it was him at an earlier age, and at some points I wonder if it is fiction at all…in fact, with the resources provided for Thomas Nelson Book Review Bloggers, there was the statement, “based on a remarkable true story.” This is something I would love to investigate more in the future.

 

Written in a manner that contains the Gospel, without direct references to the Gospel, this book also allows perspective for those not connected in the church or Christianity – even with the provision of the Love Languages Gary Chapman presents, yet in a simpler, easier to apply, format.

 

I give this book the green light for people to read, and I have been recommending this book to several individuals. The idea that I started reading on my Kindle, and found myself having difficulty putting it down…that is a very good thing.

 

Disclosure: I have received a reviewer copy and/or payment in exchange for an honest review of the product mentioned in this post.