“The How-To Guide for Generations at Work” by Robby Slaughter

The How-To Guide for Generations at Work: How Americans of Every Age View the Workplace, and How to Work Productively With Every Generation (The Efficient Professional Series Book 2)The How-To Guide for Generations at Work: How Americans of Every Age View the Workplace, and How to Work Productively With Every Generation by Robby Slaughter
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Ah, the business challenge of the day: how to handle different generations in the workplace. I am intimately familiar with this challenge: working at a community college bookstore, I am a millennial among other incoming millennials (both students and part time staff), yet my counterparts are one to two generations older than me. To top it off, I do not identify with all of the millennial trends, finding myself halfway between two diverse world views. This book seeks to help bridge the gap in understanding by clarifying how each generation looks at the workplace and how to not only connect, but work productively with each generation.

The author starts with the reality that there is a generation gap in the workplace. Therefore, this book serves not as a theoretical premise, but rather a practical guide to the concept. The author speaks on a personal level, using “you” throughout the book, which clearly eye the tone for this title – imagine a self-help book but for generational differences on a professional level. The author highlights an ideal environment, where age is a non-issue and people are rewarded based off their performance, not length of service or length of existence. He admits that this is not a common denominator for readers, however, and thus the reason for this book. This is where I have to stop sharing from the book, however, to not spoil it for you.

Should you read this book? From content alone, the question has an obvious response – do you interact with anyone of a different age ever in life? That’s your answer. If you live under a rock and are in solitude for all of eternity, there is nothing for you to learn. But if you are reading this review, then that is not the case. So, then, the only question is if you like the author’s style. The author writes with a pragmatic yet seasoned approach – not like a car salesman, but rather like a guru on the television, writing with a prose much like the preaching of Joel Osteen – inspiring, uplifting, encouraging, and moving forward.

Disclosure: I have received a reviewer copy and/or payment in exchange for an honest review of the product mentioned in this post.

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