[Audiobook] “Mere Christianity” by C.S. Lewis

Geoffrey Howard is the narrator for this audio book. I haven’t read the book itself yet, and have it sitting on my bookshelf. Unfortunately, as I am listening to the narrator’s presentation of this text, I find myself becoming disinterested in reading the book. There are two parts to this. The first is simply that it sounds more philosophical, of which at the moment I’m not terribly interested in. I’m sure, however, that I’ll find that interest piqued again in the near future. The second part, sadly, is the narration of this audio book. I know that I have a history of finding narrators to be bland or mechanical, but it is an honest issue to present. If audio books should move forward as a viable alternative to ingest the material successfully, then the narration needs to improve vastly.

Disclosure: I have received a reviewer copy and/or payment in exchange for an honest review of the product mentioned in this post.

[Audiobook] “Jesus: The Only Way to [G-d]” by John Piper

John Piper is at it again, with yet another book released. When I received this audiobook for review, I had thought that the book was a normal size, only to find that the print version is microscopically small. Unbelievable! This audiobook is narrated by Dave Heath. As a note, I try to avoid reviewing content for the audiobook, and prefer to stick to reviewing precisely why an individual may choose to acquire the audiobook over the print book. That being said, I wish to mention that I am traditionally not a fan of John Piper, but what I’ve come across thus far in listening to this book, I find myself interested enough to consider reading the book itself.

Disclosure: I have received a reviewer copy and/or payment in exchange for an honest review of the product mentioned in this post.

[Film] “The Least Among You”

Traditionally, I have done book reviews for Thomas Nelson / Booksneeze, but recently, the opportunity to review a DVD product came up. “The Least Among You” is based on a true story following the 1965 Watts riot. Following the accounts of Richard Kelly, serving probation at an all-white seminary, we follow Kelly through his trials and tribulations at an institution that shows the foundations of postmodern beliefs. Kelly forges through the difficulties with the mentoring help of the school’s gardener.
Due to a hack of the original Infinit Love Ministries website late 2010, the original review was lost. Please refer to Amazon.com for a current recommendation or enjoy the addition below…
In all, this film is very much like the earlier onslaught of Christian films – a poorer quality and documentary feel to it. While the actors did their best to portray the characters, the cinematography of the film made it to the “no” list for me – a movie I had no interest in keeping. I gave it three stars. If not for the cast, it could have easily been a two star film instead. History buffs and church fanatics may love the film, being inspired by a true story, but it’s not one for the movie library.

Disclosure: I have received a reviewer copy and/or payment in exchange for an honest review of the product mentioned in this post.