[Audiobook] “Humanitarian Jesus” by Ryan Dobson & Christian Buckley

This audiobook is reviewed by Johnny Heller. I’ve got to give the guy credit – he does a great job. And not just because our names are similiar, which is pretty sweet and tells me I have a future in the audiobook narration industry, but because he rocked the the voice for this book. It captured and fascinated me – lulled me in – and made me want to continue. I was past chapter three before I realized it. Moving quickly, and energetically, Heller gives this book the voice it needs. I picture Christian or Ryan speaking, and can see – imagine/visualize – what the writing is addressing. While still monotone, he flavors it enough to keep you moving, but not distracted. Great job. I loved listening to this audiobook.

Disclosure: I have received a reviewer copy and/or payment in exchange for an honest review of the product mentioned in this post.

[Audiobook] “Doctrine” by Mark Driscoll & Gerry Breshears

Doctrine: What Christians Should Believe, by Mark Driscoll and Gerry Breshears, is a pretty sweet book. I bought it, but haven’t read it. The audiobook, narrated by Sean Runnette, is not so sweet. While the traditional audiobook style may perk the interest of many and keep the listener going, I found myself dazing, which is definitely not a good thing if you are driving. I tried listening on my bluetooth headset while at the gym, and got a migraine. I couldn’t do it…the narrator’s voice is simply flat, monotone, computerized, and unimpressive. There’s no emotion, drive, or creativity. It is the traditional audiobook style, lacking the incredible coolness associate with SCL, David Crowder, and coffee shops. This is the Starbucks of the espresso world – corporate, plain, and accustomed. I’m a local kind of guy. It doesn’t seem to fit Driscoll’s groove.

Disclosure: I have received a reviewer copy and/or payment in exchange for an honest review of the product mentioned in this post.

“Jesus Manifesto” by Leonard Sweet & Frank Viola

“Christians have made the gospel about so many things – things other than Christ. But Jesus Christ is the gravitational pull that brings everything together and gives it meaning. Without Him, all things lose their value. They are but detached pieces floating around in space. That includes your life.” xv

 

Oh how I wish I could write such motivational and pulling words as those! This blog has taught me how to improve my writing, through experience, but I’m still so far off. Even now, as I write a book review for “Jesus Manifesto,” there’s so much that I wish I could pen, but know not how.

 

This book is crucial to where we are at – a crossroads in the faith. I’m firmly convinced that we need to make a move – all of Christianity is at stake. Sweet and Viola examine this utter reality and present what the main issue is: a lack of divinity of Christ. We get so focused on salvation, the Holy Spirit, etc., that now the “forgotten G-d” of our age is Jesus Christ, the Son. How embarrassing is that? As Sweet and Viola point out, we’ve gotten too caught up in “spiritual truth, value,virtue, or gift, yet miss Christ, who is Himself the embodiment and incarnation of all of these things.” xv

Disclosure: I have received a reviewer copy and/or payment in exchange for an honest review of the product mentioned in this post.