“The Bondage Breaker” by Neil T. Anderson

The Bondage Breaker The Bondage Breaker by Neil T. Anderson

My rating: 2 of 5 stars

In reviewing Anderson’s content, I find his materials to be fairly charismatic in nature and focused more heavily on the struggles and bondages with the demons than the victory in Christ.

This is beneficial insomuch that he gives what feels like a compendium of information regarding demonic bondage, but is detrimental in that readers will be quickly overwhelmed with the burden of spiritual warfare and may altogether miss Anderson’s comments about freedom in Christ. I personally appreciated his intimate approach with the reader, as well as giving clear steps and processes that the reader may follow to be delivered from bondage in their own lives. His content is fairly wordy, which makes it a less interesting of a read, and as a result readers could easily skim through duller pages and missed the nuggets hidden in between.

While reading through his material, I do have concerns about some of his “faulty” beliefs regarding demons. I do agree that demonic activity can still occur today, and have personally witnessed demonic possessions. However, when Anderson states that all demonic activity found in the Bible could not be related to mental illnesses at all, there is an undermining of modern science that was not available at that time. To me, the author of the book of the Bible in which illnesses could have been demonic possessions could only have explained it in such a fashion because they were not aware of those types of maladies in the age.

This, however, also has a direct correlation to whether believers literally interpret the book of Revelation as fantastical beasts, or interpreted to mean modern technologies, such as a helicopter, that did not exist back in time. In that regard, I suppose it is up to reader interpretation. Anderson’s comment about how Christians cannot be affected by demons is on par, as Christians could be influenced to make decisions of the flesh. I also appreciate how Anderson admits the daemonic influence to happen with even mild or unsuspecting sins. Overall, Anderson, although charismatic, does a decent job presenting the tough realities of spiritual bondage and demonic oppression.

On another note, Anderson has a detailed checklist for individuals to complete two “experience freedom.” While this may be beneficial for nonbelievers coming into the faith, it is intense and requires individuals to announce specific history, when the message of the cross is about deliverance, not dredging up the past. Anderson does point out that when someone comes into the faith, there is no erase pattern for habits prior to coming to Christ. This is problematic, however, as Scripture indicates that when one becomes a new creation, the old is gone. This is particularly challenging in regards to Anderson’s detailed freedom steps. He encourages individuals to complete a non-Christian spiritual checklist, which includes several items regarding cults and the occult. He then challenges individuals to complete a spiritual questionnaire about their prior experience with the supernatural.

My only experience with these things has been with extremely charismatic groups that tend to veer outside of biblical basis and create their own guidelines. Additionally, the author has a section on pronouncing wrong priorities. This list includes sports, fun, television, games, spousal interactions, and being a parent. This is extremely offensive in the area that Anderson suggests that one can be too focused on being a husband/wife or being a parent. In my personal experience, and my knowledge of the Bible, such is not a situation. Paul even pointed out that when one becomes a husband/wife or parent, they have no choice but to devote less to HaShem, as they must fulfill their obligation to their significant other and/or children. In this regard, Anderson’s material is informative yet questionable at best.

Overall, I have to ask myself: is this a book that I would recommend others to read? The answer is a wholehearted no. While Anderson can provide some beneficial information for consideration, most of his content, I feel, goes to the extreme and charismatic belief and has no biblical basis. If a book for believers lacks a firm foundation in the Bible, it can cause more harm than good and should not be read except for scholastic purposes. This book fits that bill, without exception.

The supernatural content goes from a logical basis, and even a biblical basis, to jumping the shark.

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Disclosure: I have received a reviewer copy and/or payment in exchange for an honest review of the product mentioned in this post.